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David Delamare’s mermaid artwork is known worldwide.  His original oil paintings have been reproduced on giclée prints (on paper or canvas) posters, greeting cards, nightlights, and more.

 
International Mermaid Directory visitors may take an automatic 10% off any mermaid items on the Delamare website. 
 
(Just enter coupon code “IMD” (without quotation marks) in the customer code box upon checkout.

Mer-Social Updates

7 days ago

David Delamare Art

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This is so wonderful ! Love ❤️

Love! You are amazing.

Ohhhh!! I LOVE this!!!

(Sending Kisses to the fairy)

I like, me gusta su arte.

🖤🖤🖤 That fairy is gorgeous ♡♡♡.

I love this!

Perfect for Spring❤️

Kelly Costa

🐦

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7 days ago

David Delamare Art

Here at the studio, we love rabbits and we'll be posting a number of Delamare rabbit images this week.
This is "Aeriel Renondo"—The "R" page from the alphabet book: "Animerotics: A Forbidden Cabaret in 26 Acts." This painting was purchased by the book publisher for his own personal collection. Most of the images from this book can be produced as 18x24 or 24x32 inch custom giclée prints. To order, use our archive project page at www.daviddelamare.com/archive.html and be sure to specify the image title. Artwork © David Delamare (1951-2016).
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Here at the studio, we love rabbits and well be posting a number of Delamare rabbit images this week. 
 This is Aeriel Renondo—The R page from the alphabet book: Animerotics: A Forbidden Cabaret in 26 Acts.  This painting was purchased by the book publisher for his own personal collection.  Most of the images from this book can be produced as 18x24 or 24x32 inch custom giclée prints.  To order, use our archive project page at www.daviddelamare.com/archive.html and be sure to specify the image title.  Artwork © David Delamare (1951-2016).

 

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Stunning colors ❤️

My 2 favorite things are bunnies and mermaids so of course I love David's art! My house bun, Oliver, lives in my mermaid room.

7 days ago

David Delamare Art

It's time for our annual reminder about rabbit adoption. (Please share this post.) To see more rabbit and hare images by artist David Delamare (1951-2016) please visit the album at www.facebook.com/pg/daviddelamareart/photos/?tab=album&album_id=10153223556592140&__xts__%5B0%5D=... ... See MoreSee Less

Its time for our annual reminder about rabbit adoption. (Please share this post.) To see more rabbit and hare images by artist David Delamare (1951-2016) please visit the album at https://www.facebook.com/pg/daviddelamareart/photos/?tab=album&album_id=10153223556592140&__xts__%5B0%5D=68.ARByGcXrJnrkgippf19oEYJcoAxgKhmImBF7NqcFAD8hjYIqR0LvPlWsn0ianxdN6pPlFbT_vnrd9mk2mKXTVG4j10ABj8ILBr2FdnFyTwARWmsyGJpJbv3NYBGL0bTOSKE0FFPoWmC-_iP7AzvCmBAgmS89DeoJwMEo6OJah4z7SrNGc66hn-sXexLmO89b1tzOtYEegj5eYuSgfcVJuy1V2NvfQKM0GsXsLuN9n3RGIQjKKzFqe7hcUuUNB-FZYTwjg3bdz-UdNnwJEO_NvYXN6ZA8dvariCoQJwlpankQEFJfAOVcQiDVG8QApGcMci63t33ohBu7EzwT8J0B&__tn__=-UC-R

1 week ago

David Delamare Art

Many thanks to Sean Cox who has scanned a new batch of images for our archive project. Here is an early (1983) mermaid painting titled "Mermaid and Flying Fish" © 1983 David Delamare ... See MoreSee Less

Many thanks to Sean Cox who has scanned a new batch of images for our archive project. Here is an early (1983) mermaid painting titled Mermaid and Flying Fish © 1983 David Delamare

 

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Oh wow this takes me back! When I was 8 for my birthday I received a box of shells and small mermaid figurines along with a collection of mermaid postcards. While I usually always had a David Delamare print in these birthday bundles -or surprise find in the card aisle at the store on a random occasion- I remember this one standing out so incredibly to me. The action and power yet serenity to it was mesmerizing. Pushed me to draw my own visions which I am forever thankful for. Thank you for sharing these wonderful new scans Wendy and friends! 🙏

Wow! I would love to have a print of this one! 😍

And...I ♥️ flying fish...I remember my Father and I watching them leading the way on the bow of an icean ocean liner...This is gorgeous..

When coming across this mermaid art I remember now that Disney is planning to remake The Little Mermaid into a live action 😍😍😍😍😍😍😍

Love this mermaid art 💙💙💙💙💙💙💙💙💙💙.

Wow! Beautiful! What a tremendous talent he was!

Oh wow, never seen this one...love it!!

As usual..wondetful.

One of my faves💕

Year I was born. 😍

OMG 😘

Wow.

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2 weeks ago

David Delamare Art

An enormous puppy was looking down at her with large round eyes, and feebly stretching out one paw, trying to touch her. “Poor little thing!” said Alice, in a coaxing tone, and she tried hard to whistle to it; but she was terribly frightened all the time at the thought that it might be hungry, in which case it would be very likely to eat her up in spite of all her coaxing.
Hardly knowing what she did, she picked up a little bit of stick, and held it out to the puppy: whereupon the puppy jumped into the air off all its feet at once, with a yelp of delight, and rushed at the stick, and made believe to worry it: then Alice dodged behind a great thistle, to keep herself from being run over; and, the moment she appeared on the other side, the puppy made another rush at the stick, and tumbled head over heels in its hurry to get hold of it: then Alice, thinking it was very like having a game of play with a cart-horse, and expecting every moment to be trampled under its feet, ran round the thistle again: then the puppy began a series of short charges at the stick, running a very little way forwards each time and a long way back, and barking hoarsely all the while, till at last it sat down a good way off, panting, with its tongue hanging out of its mouth, and its great eyes half shut. —From David Delamare's illustrated version of Lewis Carroll's "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland." Book website at www.delamare-alice.com Discounted "Rabbit-Hole" edition at www.daviddelamare.com
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An enormous puppy was looking down at her with large round eyes, and feebly stretching out one paw, trying to touch her. “Poor little thing!” said Alice, in a coaxing tone, and she tried hard to whistle to it; but she was terribly frightened all the time at the thought that it might be hungry, in which case it would be very likely to eat her up in spite of all her coaxing.
Hardly knowing what she did, she picked up a little bit of stick, and held it out to the puppy: whereupon the puppy jumped into the air off all its feet at once, with a yelp of delight, and rushed at the stick, and made believe to worry it: then Alice dodged behind a great thistle, to keep herself from being run over; and, the moment she appeared on the other side, the puppy made another rush at the stick, and tumbled head over heels in its hurry to get hold of it: then Alice, thinking it was very like having a game of play with a cart-horse, and expecting every moment to be trampled under its feet, ran round the thistle again: then the puppy began a series of short charges at the stick, running a very little way forwards each time and a long way back, and barking hoarsely all the while, till at last it sat down a good way off, panting, with its tongue hanging out of its mouth, and its great eyes half shut. —From David Delamares illustrated version of Lewis Carrolls Alices Adventures in Wonderland. Book website at www.delamare-alice.com Discounted Rabbit-Hole edition at www.daviddelamare.com

 

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Awww, he's captured the moment well😘

3 weeks ago

David Delamare Art

Detail from "The Caravan" by David Delamare. View full image at daviddelamare.com/mcaravan.html © David Delamare (1951-2016). All rights reserved. ... See MoreSee Less

Detail from The Caravan by David Delamare.  View full image at http://daviddelamare.com/mcaravan.html   © David Delamare (1951-2016).  All rights reserved.

 

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Thanks love all this ❤

I hear a Van Morrison song.

Allison Jordan

OH MY 😍❤️

This one is hanging in my bathroom 💕

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3 weeks ago

David Delamare Art

In case you didn't catch it in the past...https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZsJgdT5pbR8&t=37sIn 1894 wealthy eccentric Alphonse Zukor shocked European society by mounting an illegal underground alphabetic cabaret. Zukor's troupe performed a series of... ... See MoreSee Less

Video image

 

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I always wanted to interview Alphonse. :)

Oooo❤️

New to me. Fantastic! WONDERFUL.

3 weeks ago

David Delamare Art

Luckily for Alice, the little magic bottle had now had its full effect, and she grew no larger: still it was very uncomfortable, and, as there seemed to be no sort of chance of her ever getting out of the room again, no wonder she felt unhappy.

“It was much pleasanter at home,” thought poor Alice, “when one wasn’t always growing larger and smaller, and being ordered about by mice and rabbits. I almost wish I hadn’t gone down that rabbit-hole—and yet—and yet—it’s rather curious, you know, this sort of life! I do wonder what can have happened to me! When I used to read fairy tales, I fancied that kind of thing never happened, and now here I am in the middle of one! There ought to be a book written about me, that there ought! And when I grow up, I’ll write one—but I’m grown up now,” she added in a sorrowful tone: “at least there’s no room to grow up any more here.”

—From the David Delamare illustrated version of Lewis Carroll's "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland"

www.delamare-alice.com Artwork © David Delamare
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Luckily for Alice, the little magic bottle had now had its full effect, and she grew no larger: still it was very uncomfortable, and, as there seemed to be no sort of chance of her ever getting out of the room again, no wonder she felt unhappy.

“It was much pleasanter at home,” thought poor Alice, “when one wasn’t always growing larger and smaller, and being ordered about by mice and rabbits. I almost wish I hadn’t gone down that rabbit-hole—and yet—and yet—it’s rather curious, you know, this sort of life! I do wonder what can have happened to me! When I used to read fairy tales, I fancied that kind of thing never happened, and now here I am in the middle of one! There ought to be a book written about me, that there ought! And when I grow up, I’ll write one—but I’m grown up now,” she added in a sorrowful tone: “at least there’s no room to grow up any more here.”  

—From the David Delamare illustrated version of Lewis Carrolls Alices Adventures in Wonderland  

 www.delamare-alice.com  Artwork © David Delamare

 

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A little creepy for me. Sorry 😐

Awww, poor Alice 😮

A little creepy for me. Sorry 😐

Very prescient...a book being written about her...hmmmmmmmmmm

Pretty girl with a funny attitude.

ALSO THROUGH THE LOOKING-GLASS BOOK TWO ‘Be good sweet maid, and let who will be clever; Do noble things, not dream them, all day long.’ Charles Kingsley (A Farewell, To C. E. G.) 1 Thomas and Maurice (Alice’s Kittens) THOMAS AND MAURICE, which is to say, Tom and Mo, or as Alice Liddell called them, Tom and Mohawk – Alice’s kittens would not stay put in their blanketed willow basket though she tried her best to keep them there, but strayed to the footstool by the papered fireboard where the kittens’ sire had its naps. The Mother of Alice who disdained anybody who pampered his or her appetite with rich or too much unwholesome foods had often commented that the old cat’s gravy side whiskers were turning very white which she blamed on it eating too many salted sprats, but she rather liked Tom and Mohawk, the young uns’ with their large, round eyes and their frisky and healthy appearance, which were a pleasure to look at. ‘You’ll still live a long time yet, you grand old sire,’ Alice’s Father would often address the air when he put his foot on the footstool as he proceeded reading his papers; by which Alice knew he meant the old cat, which, it was practicable to say, loved nothing better than to sleep all night than run after the rats and siesta on afternoons, be these warm or cold. Alice often tried to read the meaning of her Father’s words but it seemed at variance with the grotesquerie of his ever-shifting tones. ‘But, anyway, I love Tom and Mohawk,’ the thought would immediately register in her mind; ‘Tom, I love your pure silvery white fur, which is like soft, fine wool while, you, Mohawk, I like your coal-black color which is shiny like a barracuda’s fins. Just yesterday afternoon I was playing a game with you both and at that beautiful hour when lunch being shortly over something in your eye, Mo, when you pawed your face and licked your paws made me think that you looked like a Black Duke and Tom’s flaring pink nose made me think he was very much like a Red King.’ For, if you, the reader might like to know, her fine, exquisitely carved chess pieces were scattered on the carpeted floor of the long drawing room. The carpet was the color of champagne, and some of the chessmen were standing higgedly-piggedly on the lacquered mahogany chessboard. Alice had soon picked up the Black Duchess in her left hand and she held the Red Queen in her right fist and looked over first the one and then the other, talking to them just as she would to an adult with herself assuming the manner and tone of an adult; ‘both of you exude power and much influence on the board, but you don’t find peace and commiseration from each other there, do you?’ in scrutinizing them both intently. ‘I wonder which of you is nimbler in kicking the other off the board. Whether it is you, the Red Queen, sitting in your strong place in the back row or you, the Black Duchess, teaming up with the crenelated Black Rook. I remember,’ she added, ‘you, my dear Black Duchess, often have a beagle trotting at your heels wherever you go – such an extremely diffident, faithful little dog with such a shy, doggy smile, as lowering its eyes it is sighing for all the world to notice it and remark by which it considers as consisting of other dogs a-saying, “We are the thorns in each other’s sides, but we can’t help that…”’ ‘I remember The Red King addressing the Black Duke haughtily, ‘You have Black dragoons and Black grenadiers and your florid-faced Black Bishop with his crozier and gold vestments, many trumpeters and pursuivant-attendants and also fancy-dressed heralds in their black and grey habiliments, I ain’t afraid of! Would you prefer a sullen-faced teller of truth or a cheerful and pleasant liar? Your mistress, the Black Duchess, like myself, is a beautiful piece: a full two-and-half inches tall despite her stoutness, if she draws herself up to her full height.”’ Then, Alice who now was still holding the Black Duchess in her hand, turned to it and addressed it thus: ‘you will no doubt treat your dog once in a while to a dog’s pyjama party: and I wonder if you’d have Pointers, Collies, a Boxer or two, with their asymmetrical pugnacious faces – a Pembroke Welsh Corgi, a Chihuahua, a Pomeranian as well as a King Charles Spaniel, a Schnauzer, a Papillion, a Fox terrier, an Affenpinscher, a Yorkshire Terrier, a Skye Terrier, a Chow-chow… a Harrier, a Brussels Griffon, a Maltese, a Pekinese, a Toy Manchester Terrier and… and then gleefully eavesdrop on their querulous yelp-yelps and fights …?’ until, finally, dropping the dark-eyed woman with the loud, low-pitched voice, coolly, Alice proceeded to pick up the Red King. Having being wakened from his doze the expression on his majesty’s lineaments was as if wearied of his crown which sat upon his head and ringed his brow which auburn curls were peeping out, as he addressed the little girl: ‘Hmm, I don’t want to stoke the fire of your feelings child, my dear, but what? A cutting board again?’ said he; pointing with disenthusiasm to the chess board; ‘with so many heads lined up for the chopping, today? And the savage chef, who was born to the family of executioners, from a long line of executioners didn’t he always say, “Those French loaves want cutting?” ‘Yes, I am used to his ways, but he still provokes surprise, my dear,’ the Red Queen replied, ‘Do you know what the Black Duke said to the Black Duchess?’ ‘Yes: the Black Duke had been saying that he had settled down to waging a war and saying to his wife, “There is romance galore in stirring actions: what are you complaining of, my dear? Do you think Petrarch would write his Canzoniere if Laura was his wife? Don’t make yourself the subject of your fine, domestic feelings, my dear, because we are on a war footing and at any moment the other shoe might drop.’ He was looking a trifle pale as if he disliked being involved in sordid national policies but his enemy from across the board, the Red King, was now calling out loudly to his cleric standing next to him to impart a benison on his troops. Alice was feeling very sleepy and there seemed to be sandbags underneath her eyelids and the next thing she was conscious of was she was engaged in playing chess with her sister, Edith, by the bank of a little Thames’ backwater where little ducks and a few mother ducks and gaggles of honking geese were swimming. As Alice looked about her, the scene before her was changed as if her feelings, which, like the indents of a flute having closed or opened in a very particular way as the player tootled a melody, or as an optical instrument, which had many lenses that were superimposed and having filters, on the same account, were opened or closed, it was a strange sight that the little girl perceived because she saw that she and her sister were foot-soldiers in the middle of the second row of an enormous grassy chessboard but on opposing sides, and they were ready to advance and fight. Sunlight was pouring down and in the sunny hedge adagio music drifted, the Red King, declaring in a bellicose, yet flat voice, ‘Strike up a martial tune and let the assiduous boys play their fifes, for, I daresay, I will march into hell for this cause of mine and may heaven grant my right to victory.’

2Visit to an old gentleman Alice, in gazing back through the Looking-glass into the room on the other side from whence she had come, saw that it was just as clear, bright and placid: from the way the fire lingered and played about the objects there as cast upon them by the burning logs in the chimney which view she was cut off. The walls and windows of the drawing room where she was in now were much the same as that of the Deanery, though the cross-stitch which had hung there on the wall and signed ‘My house’Alice (Aged 6) now read ‘Mein Hous’. Moreover, though it had been picked out with blue thread, now the thread of her needlework was attar of roses. ‘How is it that in this room all the books correspond, though I can’t make out the titles, and all the furniture, including the divan and the footstool, and my little watercolor of a brawling brook ALSO, as though the angels know both my name and my little self?’thought Alice, ‘And oh, how I could look over there at that rendezvous corner where my sisters and I choose to elude our Nurse or watch life unfolding in that other room like looking at the pictures of a magic lantern! But, however, if nobody came, that might prove to be dull entertainment this afternoon, mightn’t it?’Pursuing the same vein of thought, Alice continued: ‘This seemed like a long and broad building and I wish someone has saved something for me to eat; for it seems to me getting through a Looking-glass is such painstaking work.’She was thinking about this, as she walked down the passage a little absentmindedly, and thinking about the Duchess’s babe who turned into a pig, ‘saying to herself, ‘Flying pigs of meat! Figs –you mean. Ha? Tons of pork! I hope I do not find the Black Duchess’s beagle here, or hear pure kennel voices in excited hue-and-cry with regard to that pajama party of the canines, but a bagel or two set aside for me would be lovely because I fear I am having one of my appetites again.’As she went up the stairs, the boards creaked so loudly that she thought she must have unaccountably eaten a hefty lunch and must have put on considerable weight because in her own house she was often remarked upon by her family for her nimble feet and lively tread. She found herself standing before a study door which was just like her Dad’s, thinking whether she was now fat at the same time, and how she would like it, but, as she was trying hard to remember to knock in a particular style in some confusion, her gaze fell square upon some writings on the glass pane, which, after a pause, she exclaimed with unconscious delight as children having being promised with an ice-cream treat: ‘Of course, these puzzling words are Looking-glass words!’These were the words that Alice could make out, by reading them backwards: (Scriptorium) Sir Percy W. Jabberwocky (K.C.M.G., K.C.B) LLB., Lit.B., Ph.B. (hon.) Finding, however, she had forgotten the prescribed knocks in her excitement Alice finally settled upon calling out timidly, ‘Knock, knock, Jabberwock.’) Thereafter, somebody came (lumbered) slowly to the door and a voice from within, sounding self-interrogatory about a painful subject or reminisce she didn’t know anything about, was saying: ‘Scrape that hurt from your heart, my boyo! Don’t mind him, he was just a young blade.’And then, more pointedly, and seeming to address the girl herself, she heard him muttering as he fumbled with a key: ‘To the fearful everything rustles and creaks, an ancient Greek says in my book. Do not be afraid,’Sir Percy Jabberwocky, opening unto her, added, ‘Qui la? Qui sont vous? Oh, come in, Alice. ‘D’you still remember da poem? I am the Jabberwocky (an unalloyed famous name from an outstanding family) but don’t confuse me with Jabberwock which was that dastardly sword rattling boy.’“‘Twas brillig, and the slithy toves Did gyre and gimble in the wabe: All mimsy were the borogoves, And the mome raths outgrabe. Beware the Jabberwocky, my son! The jaws that bite, the claws that catch! Beware the Jubjub bird, and shun The frumious Bandersnatch! ………And hast thou slain the Jabberwock? Come to my arms, my beamish boy! O frabjous day! Callooh! Callay!’He chortled in his joy. ‘Twas brillig, and the slithy toves Did gyre and gimble in the wabe: All mimsy were the borogoves, And the mome raths outgrabe.”As the sharp-faced bespectacled old man was repeating the last stanza with no uncertain grimness about the mouth and squaring his frightful jaw, Alice thought to herself, ‘His pasty, pock-marked face with its bony projections from his brows are enough to strike awe into his beholders,’but aloud she timidly observed: ‘How discolored are your looks, sir (unlike the light from the window dat is bleedin’da bleached table-cloths red). But what happened to the Jubjub bird and the frumious Bandersnatch?’‘They have both disappeared. A young Jabberwocky’s heart can only be broken twice and after that, he was in the driver’s seat and that is very empowering, but when I was but –er –before I came to man’s estate –it was the voice that swallowed all other voices in my heart like a whirlwind;

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3 weeks ago

David Delamare Art

“But who is to give the prizes?” quite a chorus of voices asked.
“Why, she, of course,” said the Dodo, pointing to Alice with one finger; and the whole party at once crowded round her, calling out, in a confused way, “Prizes! Prizes!”
Alice had no idea what to do, and in despair she put her hand in her pocket, and pulled out a box of comfits (luckily the salt water had not got into it), and handed them round as prizes. There was exactly one a-piece, all round.
“But she must have a prize herself, you know,” said the Mouse.
“Of course,” the Dodo replied very gravely. “What else have you got in your pocket?” it went on, turning to Alice.
“Only a thimble,” said Alice sadly.
“Hand it over here,” said the Dodo.
Then they all crowded round her once more, while the Dodo solemnly presented the thimble, saying “We beg your acceptance of this elegant thimble”; and, when it had finished this short speech, they all cheered.
Alice thought the whole thing very absurd, but they all looked so grave that she did not dare to laugh; and, as she could not think of anything to say, she simply bowed, and took the thimble, looking as solemn as she could.
—From David Delamare's illustrated version of Lewis Carroll's "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland." Books and print at www.delamare-alice.com
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“But who is to give the prizes?” quite a chorus of voices asked.
“Why, she, of course,” said the Dodo, pointing to Alice with one finger; and the whole party at once crowded round her, calling out, in a confused way, “Prizes! Prizes!”
Alice had no idea what to do, and in despair she put her hand in her pocket, and pulled out a box of comfits (luckily the salt water had not got into it), and handed them round as prizes. There was exactly one a-piece, all round.
“But she must have a prize herself, you know,” said the Mouse.
“Of course,” the Dodo replied very gravely. “What else have you got in your pocket?” it went on, turning to Alice.
“Only a thimble,” said Alice sadly.
“Hand it over here,” said the Dodo.
Then they all crowded round her once more, while the Dodo solemnly presented the thimble, saying “We beg your acceptance of this elegant thimble”; and, when it had finished this short speech, they all cheered.
Alice thought the whole thing very absurd, but they all looked so grave that she did not dare to laugh; and, as she could not think of anything to say, she simply bowed, and took the thimble, looking as solemn as she could.
—From David Delamares illustrated version of Lewis Carrolls Alices Adventures in Wonderland. Books and print at www.delamare-alice.com

 

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FANTASIA FROM LEWIS CARROLL’S ALICE: By JOHN TAN An Alice Extravaganza! BOOK ONE ‘Oh fame! –if I eager took delight in thy praises, ‘Twas less for the sake of thy high-sounding phrases, Than to see the bright eyes of the dear one discover She thought that I was not unworthy to love her. There chiefly I sought thee, there only I found thee; Her glance was the best of the rays that surround thee; When it sprinkled o’er aught that was bright in my story, I knew it was love, and felt it was glory.’(Lord Byron) 1 NAME OF THE GAME WHEN OUR STORY began, the housekeeper, who also managed the cooking had just brought her posset for her master because Dodgson was nursing a slight cold, but the children and his friend, Duckworth, who had unimpaired appetites, were enjoying the best part of the biggest turnip and half-cooked onions. The two Oxford gentlemen were in their smart lounge suits and a dish of flummery lay on the table. On this particular day which would be steeped in their remembrances, they were happily together on the ground floor of Tom Quad’s north-western corner where the Reverend had his rooms. Robinson Duckworth, a friend of Ludwidge Dodgson’s, had just come to pay his colleague a visit in order to regale them with his company so that having arrived in time at the story’s inception he was assigned a role and identified himself as Lord Castleduck. In giving himself a double boost, moreover, with the view of ensuring a good beginning Mr Dodgson had allowed himself the double pleasure of appropriating two names, Mr. Picayune Rat, which he was given, and also, Mr Rubicund Toad, which he devised for himself; and whenever he chose it, henceforth, these were his alter egos. It was the Nellie Eaglet whose real name was Edith, who had thought up her new name, because, she supposed, in the chapter ‘A Caucus-race and a Long Tail’aha! the Eaglet mentioned therein was herself. Similarly, her elder sister, Lorina, needless to say, was the Lory, by the same token. For the sake of brevity, and his love of all things mathematical, Mr Charles Dodgson, Professor of Mathematics, Christ Church College, Oxford, had developed the habit of calling Dean Liddell’s third daughter Secunda and the second daughter, Prima; whereas, Tertia, his favorite Child-friend, or, Alice, -- the inspiration behind the creation of her namesake with regard to his most famous book -- was now given, in this brand-new yarn, the name Miss Saint-Ormolu Owlet while Lorina, or Prima, bore the name Miss Taffeta Rabbit. In one of those memorable years which saw the nineteenth century passed its middle mark and was getting fairly along Alice Liddell was nine years old…‘I can see the fruiter’s boy,’said the small-built, prominent and distinguished, gentlemanly figure, who sported the longer hair, Mr Dodgson, himself, ‘has supplied our dessert with ample pears, peaches and luscious grapes and Seville oranges’; as looking over his shoulder, a slight if fugitive smile was playing upon his girlish lips when he turned round to look again at his friends gathered by his side: and then, in resuming a brief, sidelong glance at what he called his ‘fuliginous’chimney -- which was completely blackened with dirt, grime, and soot -- remarked it was notably red with live coals, as well; a combination which hardly failed to stir that imaginative machine of his; for this well-tuned mental device was always turned on and kept running. So when Alice’s eldest sister, Evina, walked in Dodgson said he observed that she had not materialized out of thin air nor crossed the threshold but he was quite observantly positive, she had come down the flues of the same chimney as though out from the mouth or “fumarole”of a hot, vaporous volcano. ‘Well, I am standing on your dining-room rug, now, sir,’Ervina replied laughingly, ‘just nicely warm, am I not? But, say –did you see by what transportation I had come?’‘Yes, indeed: you came in a coach and your new name is now Miss Pinafore Mole!’‘Ah, ay, then, you freebooter, Picayune, you, even so with a rat’s frontlet, I pray you, pay the stage driver before the horses rush up the flues, won’t you, my dear, sir?’Miss Mole tittered. ‘So I am to be a Mr Picayune, and a Rat, now, eh? But, I believe I like the name! So spiffy, and apt! I had thought to be a toad! A Mr. Rubicund, and jolly Toad! But never mind—I will be both! Come, you pay him, Miss Mole! Here's the money!' he instantly rejoined; as he flung something shiny and round which dinged in the palm of her hand before she caught it. ‘What are you, a Mole, doing up a chimney?’observed one of Ervina’s sisters, Miss Taffeta Rabbit, to the sound of the beating of wings and the coughing of rodents; ‘A Mole is supposed to burrow downwards going deep in the ground and not take a coach-and-six from up there and fly off into the ethereal skies, as I take it, that’s the way things are usually managed. I am, for your information, none other than a Miss Taffeta Rabbit.’‘And I shall call myself Miss Nellie Eaglet,’Edith Liddell said decidedly. ‘Yes –er -- yes! Lord Castleduck, is yours very truly, and he himself has hailed from Ravenna, Italy,’said Duckworth; ‘but you girls Miss Eaglet and Miss Taffeta must, of course, be hardy Swiss girls from Ingolstadt resistant to colds! And little Alice is Mademoiselle Saint-Ormolu, a French Girl-owlet, who comes from distant Dom Remy, with the very heart of the Maid of Orleans.’

💜--Once again, evincing an eagerness for fresh literary extravagance, pursuits, exploits, and even, escapades, on a rain-driven evening Professor Charles Dodgson announced before his colleague, Robinson Duckworth, that, while, mentally casting aside all things related to mathematics, logic, and numeracy, which was taking up many long hours when he had to prepare for and give lectures; he was ready, right now, to read to him from another of his freshly-wrought, recast, and reimagined tract or chapter (of his first Alice book), titled, A Caucus-race and a Long Tail... For, what his oral productions were were intimations of Monmouth’s “The History of the Kings of Britain”: a reproduction, to wit, not only in its tone but in substance; so that it hardly failed in producing a highly pronounced effect on one and all…‘Ugh,’said the Lory with a shiver. ‘A thousand pardons,’the Mouse frowned slightly; but then quickly added: ‘Did you speak?’‘You should wonder!’said the Lory with undisguised umbrage, ‘Not I.’‘Hmm! Thought you did,’the Mouse said, wryly with the same unchanging smiling disposition: ‘I proceed.’And the Mouse went on; disregarding oh! how many attempts at ill-concealed, low humor, these weren’t known, as it went on discoursing about an Edwin, a Morcar, a Stigand and an Edgar Atheling and William the Conqueror, but this you can read, Duckworth, in my first published book. Till, turning to Alice, the Mouse asked, ‘Are you still soaked to the skin, my dear?’‘Yes, I’m afraid your method doesn’t seem to benefit me. I still have many a wet stitch on me.’ ‘In that case, butted in the Dodo, a snuffling, heavy-breather, –at the same time fogging up its monocle: ‘I move that the meeting adjourn for the immediate adoption of more energetic remedies--’‘Speak English!’the Eaglet riposted immediately: ‘I don’t know what you mean by that long sentence and big words; and epistemically don’t pretend, sir, that you do either!’And that impudent poppycock of an Eaglet bent its head under its wing the better to hide a leering smile whereas the other birds tittered aloud openly. ‘I don’t want to take advice from a foolish, extinct, fine-feathered --’the Lory jumped up, adding disputatiously. ‘Well, if you and I decide to ditch epistemology as ineffective or you would quit questioning my methodology the tip top thing to get us dry would be a running the Caucus-race.’‘What is a Caucus-race? Surely you don’t mean something as relating to a Caucasian or a famous mountain range?’Alice proffered, smiling. (Upon this point, she was well up in her Geography, as, for instance, she knew that Ben Nevis in Scotland is the highest peak in Great Britain.) ‘Why, the best thing to explain it is to do it, of course,’said the Dodo. So the Dodo proceeded to mark out a racecourse, which was roughly a sort of circle. ‘The exact shape doesn’t matter,’it said. All the bedraggled animals who wanted to take part were placed along the course and no, “un, deux, trois”was announced; for each was to begin running when each liked and then to leave off when each liked, likewise. Hence, Alice thought that it was not easy to judge when this intriguing race was over! But none of the animals and bird refused to take part and nattering and ranting, away they went, until, about half an hour later, the Dodo (it had fallen asleep) suddenly woke up and called out, ‘The Caucus-race is officially over.’Some of the troop of animals and birds who now finally desisted their exertions asked breathlessly, ‘Who has won this beautiful and victorious race?’This was a question the Dodo couldn’t answer without a deal of sundry thought, and, while the others waited as peaceably as their natures would allow them, he stood a little way off, deep in his cogitations, until, moved by a genial thought or inspiration, he adjudged everybody equal winners, and therefore, everybody must have prizes. Now, the chorus of voices demanded, ‘But who ought to give away the prizes…?’Without hesitating a moment, the Dodo again took charge of the decision-making process: ‘Why, she, of course,’pointing to Alice with the tip of its wing and immediately the whole bunch of animals and birds began to congregate about the little girl; some breathing down her neck and others yelling insistently and confusedly: ‘Prizes! Prizes!’In the act of protesting she had nothing to give anyone, Alice, in putting her hand idly into her pocket, felt inside it a box of comfits. She pulled it out and quickly distributed the comfits to quell the rapidly-increasing din. However, each of these comfits was soaked because of their being wetted by Alice’s tears earlier; though, fortunately, since there was exactly one apiece, any possible quarrel among the recipients due to oversight or unfairness was therefore offset... When this was done the Mouse caught Alice’s eye and seeing the famished and wan expression on her face, due to her running the Caucus-race as well, it remarked, ‘She must have a prize, too, you know…?’‘Of course! Even so!’the Dodo under the circumstance thought it was wise and politic to say so, and, turning to Alice it went on, ‘What, my dear, have you got in your other pocket?’

I love this one too. It's hanging in my living room.

It’s taken me about 43 years to figure out why I always pick the thimble when I play classic Monopoly. Finally hit me just now!

That bird looks weird above Alice's right hand 😂

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3 weeks ago

David Delamare Art

David Delamare's mermaid playing card series. Prints at daviddelamare.com/queen.html These clever images were designed for a set of cards that I still hope to produce. These were quite difficult to produce since David had to create a mirror image. He resolved after this series that for any future cards he'd paint just one half and produce the final card digitally. © David Delamare All rights reserved. ... See MoreSee Less

David Delamares mermaid playing card series. Prints at http://daviddelamare.com/queen.html   These clever images were designed for a set of cards that I still hope to produce.  These were quite difficult to produce since David had to create a mirror image.  He resolved after this series that for any future cards hed paint just one half and produce the final card digitally.  © David Delamare All rights reserved.

 

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Wow. I just love these. I would love a set when available.. 💖🍒

Proudly display the original sketches in my home!

That's a deck I would totally use!

I have always wanted a set of these but since David’s passing I wasn’t sure you’d be able to finish them ! Please let me know if you do so I can purchase them ! Thanks

Wonderful Sign me up for a deck

They’re fabulous, I want a set!!! How long will we have to wait for these?

That man was after mine own heart....❤️❤️❤️

I was captured by the queen of hearts when these were first revealed.

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4 weeks ago

David Delamare Art

“What I was going to say,” said the Dodo in an offended tone, “was, that the best thing to get us dry would be a Caucus-race.”
“What is a Caucus-race?” said Alice; not that she much wanted to know, but the Dodo had paused as if it thought that somebody ought to speak, and no one else seemed inclined to say anything.
“Why,” said the Dodo, “the best way to explain it is to do it.” (And, as you might like to try the thing yourself, some winter-day, I will tell you how the Dodo managed it.)
First it marked out a race-course, in a sort of circle (“the exact shape doesn’t matter,” it said), and then all the party were placed along the course, here and there. There was no “One, two, three, and away!”, but they began running when they liked, and left off when they liked, so that it was not easy to know when the race was over. However, when they had been running half an hour or so, and were quite dry again, the Dodo suddenly called out “The race is over!”, and they all crowded round it, panting, and asking “But who has won?”
This question the Dodo could not answer without a great deal of thought, and it stood for a long time with one finger pressed upon its forehead (the position in which you usually see Shakespeare, in the pictures of him), while the rest waited in silence. At last the Dodo said “Everybody has won, and all must have prizes.”
(From David Delamare's illustrated version of Lewis Carroll's "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland.") Learn more at www.delamare-alice.com Art © David Delamare. All rights reserved.
... See MoreSee Less

“What I was going to say,” said the Dodo in an offended tone, “was, that the best thing to get us dry would be a Caucus-race.”
“What is a Caucus-race?” said Alice; not that she much wanted to know, but the Dodo had paused as if it thought that somebody ought to speak, and no one else seemed inclined to say anything.
“Why,” said the Dodo, “the best way to explain it is to do it.” (And, as you might like to try the thing yourself, some winter-day, I will tell you how the Dodo managed it.)
First it marked out a race-course, in a sort of circle (“the exact shape doesn’t matter,” it said), and then all the party were placed along the course, here and there. There was no “One, two, three, and away!”, but they began running when they liked, and left off when they liked, so that it was not easy to know when the race was over. However, when they had been running half an hour or so, and were quite dry again, the Dodo suddenly called out “The race is over!”, and they all crowded round it, panting, and asking “But who has won?”
This question the Dodo could not answer without a great deal of thought, and it stood for a long time with one finger pressed upon its forehead (the position in which you usually see Shakespeare, in the pictures of him), while the rest waited in silence. At last the Dodo said “Everybody has won, and all must have prizes.”
(From David Delamares illustrated version of Lewis Carrolls Alices Adventures in Wonderland.) Learn more at www.delamare-alice.com  Art © David Delamare.  All rights reserved.

 

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Love the mouse in his waistcoat 😍

Must admit...had to look up the complete list of definitions for "caucus"...since currently it is typically used in a political sense. Viewing its "synonyms"...it actually can describe a meeting, assembly, gathering, get-together, etc. Think I might just use it sometime in an "everyday" conversation!

Precious.

1 month ago

David Delamare Art

However, she soon made out that she was in the pool of tears which she had wept when she was nine feet high.
“I wish I hadn’t cried so much!” said Alice, as she swam about, trying to find her way out. “I shall be punished for it now, I suppose, by being drowned in my own tears! That will be a queer thing, to be sure! However, everything is queer to-day.”
Just then she heard something splashing about in the pool a little way off, and she swam nearer to make out what it was: at first she thought it must be a walrus or hippopotamus, but then she remembered how small she was now, and she soon made out that it was only a mouse, that had slipped in like herself.

—From the David Delamare illustrated version of Lewis Carroll's "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland"

Prints and book at www.delamare-alice.com Artwork © 2012 David Delamare
... See MoreSee Less

However, she soon made out that she was in the pool of tears which she had wept when she was nine feet high.
“I wish I hadn’t cried so much!” said Alice, as she swam about, trying to find her way out. “I shall be punished for it now, I suppose, by being drowned in my own tears! That will be a queer thing, to be sure! However, everything is queer to-day.”
Just then she heard something splashing about in the pool a little way off, and she swam nearer to make out what it was: at first she thought it must be a walrus or hippopotamus, but then she remembered how small she was now, and she soon made out that it was only a mouse, that had slipped in like herself.

—From the David Delamare illustrated version of Lewis Carrolls Alices Adventures in Wonderland  

Prints and book at www.delamare-alice.com  Artwork © 2012 David DelamareImage attachment

 

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The Alice series continues to be my favorite. Even reading a small part of Carroll's beautiful prose initiates contemplation...as well as putting me in a serene mood....Ommmmmmmmmm

I love this one.

So sweet ..

1 month ago

David Delamare Art

A few pieces from our gallery of original figurative paintings at www.daviddelamare.com/origfigures.html This was David's favorite series (and mine). For a future art book. ... See MoreSee Less

A few pieces from our gallery of original figurative paintings at http://www.daviddelamare.com/origfigures.html  This was Davids favorite series (and mine).  For a future art book.Image attachmentImage attachment

 

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Love the colors and lghting❤️

♡.

1 month ago

David Delamare Art

I recently mentioned online that I'm willing to serve as a gallery for original work. But, frankly, I didn't expect to see anyone relinquish a piece as spectacular as this 48"x24" canvas. This was a commission that David was quite proud of. It illustrated a poem written by one of our favorite patrons. If you are interested in a possible purchase, please message me privately via this page and I'll share details. Custom prints of this image are available at www.daviddelamare.com/chocolate.html ... See MoreSee Less

I recently mentioned online that Im willing to serve as a gallery for original work.  But, frankly, I didnt expect to see anyone relinquish a piece as spectacular as this 48x24 canvas.  This was a commission that David was quite proud of.  It illustrated a poem written by one of our favorite patrons. If you are interested in a possible purchase, please message me privately via this page and Ill share details. Custom prints of this image are available at www.daviddelamare.com/chocolate.html

 

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Love this! Mermaids and chocolate! Perfect combo! <3

Oh wow, Wendy. "Spectacular" is the right word. I'd love to see the original. Probably out of my budget, but I can dream!

There is an innocence in this that touches me... Beautiful!

I remember when he painted this, I emailed him shortly after about maybe painting something for me. I always hoped I'd eventually have the extra money for him to paint it. I could find someone else to do it but it would never compare to what I imagined the painting he would have done.

I remember seeing him paint this. I loved seeing how much it changed throughout the whole process

❤️Ahhhh❤️❤️

If Gypsy Medina comes your way, let me know 😁

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2 months ago

David Delamare Art

"The Wager" www.daviddelamare.com/wager.html ©David Delamare (1951-2016) ... See MoreSee Less

The Wager www.daviddelamare.com/wager.html   ©David Delamare (1951-2016)

 

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I love this print. I have it in a blank card I ordered online years ago. I framed it and it’s on my living room wall.

Omg all of your work is so outstanding amazing

This was one of the paintings that made me fall in love with David's work

LOVE this!

Love all the small details in this one

Love all of David's mermaids!!!

This is incredible

This is one of my favorites I had matted and framed.

This piece has always been one of my favorites.

Bought it years ago, hangs in my bedroom

İ love it 💛💛💛🧡🧡🧡

Looks like Johnny Depp got his Jack Sparrow inspiration from this....xx xx

Oooh never seen this one!

Love this one so hard!

Lovely❤️

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2 months ago

David Delamare Art

Any of these images can be made into large custom giclée prints.Send a message to Wendy for details.Any of these images can be made into large custom giclée prints.Send a message to Wendy for details. ... See MoreSee Less

Any of these images can be made into large custom giclée prints.Send a message to Wendy for details.Image attachment

 

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Yes.

Paulo Augusto Galembeck Renata Galembeck

Sam Jean

2 months ago

David Delamare Art

Any of these images can be made into large custom giclée prints.Send a message to Wendy for details.Any of these images can be made into large custom giclée prints.Send a message to Wendy for details. ... See MoreSee Less

Any of these images can be made into large custom giclée prints.Send a message to Wendy for details.Image attachmentImage attachment

 

Comment on Facebook

Yes.

Paulo Augusto Galembeck Renata Galembeck

Sam Jean

2 months ago

David Delamare Art

Any of these images can be made into large custom giclée prints.Send a message to Wendy for details.Any of these images can be made into large custom giclée prints.Send a message to Wendy for details. ... See MoreSee Less

 

Comment on Facebook

Yes.

Paulo Augusto Galembeck Renata Galembeck

Sam Jean

2 months ago

David Delamare Art

Here's an early anthropomorphic image. David and I liked to call these characters "Gentleman Beasts." This is "Mr. Dint in Capris" Artwork © 1988 David Delamare ... See MoreSee Less

Heres an early anthropomorphic image. David and I liked to call these characters Gentleman Beasts.  This is Mr. Dint in Capris  Artwork © 1988 David DelamareImage attachment

 

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Love the overall blush☺️

Precious...

💗💖💝

2 months ago

David Delamare Art

It was all very well to say “Drink me,” but the wise little Alice was not going to do that in a hurry. “No, I’ll look first,” she said, “and see whether it’s marked ‘poison’ or not”; for she had read several nice little stories about children who had got burnt, and eaten up by wild beasts, and other unpleasant things, all because they would not remember the simple rules their friends had taught them: such as, that a red-hot poker will burn you if you hold it too long; and that, if you cut your finger very deeply with a knife, it usually bleeds; and she had never forgotten that, if you drink much from a bottle marked “poison,” it is almost certain to disagree with you, sooner or later.
However, this bottle was not marked “poison,” so Alice ventured to taste it, and, finding it very nice (it had, in fact, a sort of mixed flavour of cherry-tart, custard, pine-apple, roast turkey, toffy, and hot buttered toast), she very soon finished it off.

—From the David Delamare illustrated version of Lewis Carroll's "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland"

www.delamare-alice.com Artwork © David Delamare
... See MoreSee Less

It was all very well to say “Drink me,” but the wise little Alice was not going to do that in a hurry. “No, I’ll look first,” she said, “and see whether it’s marked ‘poison’ or not”; for she had read several nice little stories about children who had got burnt, and eaten up by wild beasts, and other unpleasant things, all because they would not remember the simple rules their friends had taught them: such as, that a red-hot poker will burn you if you hold it too long; and that, if you cut your finger very deeply with a knife, it usually bleeds; and she had never forgotten that, if you drink much from a bottle marked “poison,” it is almost certain to disagree with you, sooner or later.
However, this bottle was not marked “poison,” so Alice ventured to taste it, and, finding it very nice (it had, in fact, a sort of mixed flavour of cherry-tart, custard, pine-apple, roast turkey, toffy, and hot buttered toast), she very soon finished it off. 

—From the David Delamare illustrated version of Lewis Carrolls Alices Adventures in Wonderland  

 www.delamare-alice.com  Artwork © David DelamareImage attachment

 

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Those every-flavour beans invented by J.K. Rowling may have been inspired by this passage from Lewis Carroll. This is Rowling's text: "You want to be careful with these. When they say every flavour, they mean every flavour — you know you get all the ordinary ones like chocolate and peppermint and marmalade, but then you can get spinach and liver and tripe. George reckons he had a bogey-flavoured one once." —Ron Weasley's warning

2 months ago

David Delamare Art

"Feeding the Dolphins" © 1993 David Delamare. This lovely painting appeared on the cover of the first edition of the book, "Mermaids & Magic Shows: The Paintings of David Delamare." ... See MoreSee Less

Feeding the Dolphins © 1993 David Delamare.  This lovely painting appeared on the cover of the first edition of the book, Mermaids & Magic Shows: The Paintings of David Delamare.

 

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Another of my favorites!

Wendy, do you have copies of this book to sell? I found a couple used online, one with alt. cover, but if you have any to sell, please let me know. Thanks.

Love that one and we get to look at the painting every day. ❤️❤️❤️

This is my introduction to Davids art. Still have the book❤️❤️

Tui Allen

❤️❤️❤️

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2 months ago

David Delamare Art

Alice was not a bit hurt, and she jumped up on to her feet in a moment: she looked up, but it was all dark overhead: before her was another long passage, and the White Rabbit was still in sight, hurrying down it. There was not a moment to be lost: away went Alice like the wind, and was just in time to hear it say, as it turned a corner, “Oh my ears and whiskers, how late it’s getting!” (from David Delamare's illustrated version of Lewis Carroll's "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland." Artwork © David Delamare) www.delamare-alice.com ... See MoreSee Less

Alice was not a bit hurt, and she jumped up on to her feet in a moment: she looked up, but it was all dark overhead: before her was another long passage, and the White Rabbit was still in sight, hurrying down it. There was not a moment to be lost: away went Alice like the wind, and was just in time to hear it say, as it turned a corner, “Oh my ears and whiskers, how late it’s getting!” (from David Delamares illustrated version of Lewis Carrolls Alices Adventures in Wonderland. Artwork © David Delamare)  www.delamare-alice.comImage attachment

2 months ago

David Delamare Art

This is an example of a composition that David Delamare liked and returned to. The first mermaid painting was created in 1981. The more colorful version was created in 1997. It illustrates a passage in Shakespeare's play "A Midsummer Night's Dream." Oberon speaks to Robin Goodfellow: "My dear Puck, come here. You remember the time when I was sitting on a cliff, and I heard a mermaid sitting on a dolphin’s back sing such a sweet and harmonious song that it calmed the stormy sea and made stars shoot out of the sky so they could hear her better?" I've also included the painting, "A Midsummer Night's Dream" that illustrates a different scene from the same play. All artwork © David Delamare (1951-2016) ... See MoreSee Less

This is an example of a composition that David Delamare liked and returned to.  The first mermaid painting was created in 1981.  The more colorful version was created in 1997.  It illustrates a passage in Shakespeares play A Midsummer Nights Dream.  Oberon speaks to Robin Goodfellow: My dear Puck, come here. You remember the time when I was sitting on a cliff, and I heard a mermaid sitting on a dolphin’s back sing such a sweet and harmonious song that it calmed the stormy sea and made stars shoot out of the sky so they could hear her better?    Ive also included the painting, A Midsummer Nights Dream that illustrates a different scene from the same play.  All artwork © David Delamare (1951-2016)Image attachmentImage attachment

 

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It really is fascinating that he revised old images so successfully and with such interesting variations. It was really pretty brilliant, which, of course he was! I love the study of David Delamare!

I love dolphins and mermaids!

The harp is fantastic!

This composition is incredible!!!

Love love love love!

One of My favorites

💖❤️. Just love his mermaids.

Love both the Harp art so many paintings happened between the two so much similarities and differences

Oh My,My,My☺️❤️

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Business Name

Bad Monkey Productions

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503-232-9947

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David Delamare & Wendy Ice

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Take 10% off any mermaid items at www.daviddelamare.com. (Just use coupon code "IMD" (without quotation marks) in wlt_fielder code box.

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